iFanboy – Episode #195 – Icons: Jim Lee

iFanboy - Episode #195 - Icons: Jim Lee

When you talk about titans, or Icons, of the comic book industry, there is no way you can ignore the current co-publisher of DC Comics, Jim Lee. From his beg…

From a performance at Stanford University’s Bing Concert Hall. February 1, 2013. Sunday Prokeimenon in Mode 1. MS Patmos 221 (ca. 1162-1179) Program note: Dr…

24 Responses to “iFanboy – Episode #195 – Icons: Jim Lee”

  1. eftultima says:

    what is Jim lees favorite style i wonder?

  2. Sed1er says:

    I wish they still used that late 80’s early 90’s art. I am disgusted by
    today’s art. I usually never read much because art is a big thing for me
    and most ppl i know don’t care for the art and just read for the story.?

  3. gsmcs says:

    i just ordered this book on amazon i can’t wait for it to arrive

  4. Frogwai says:

    I hate this guy’s art style. It pretty much sums up exactly what sucks
    about 90s comics.

  5. juggernaut44 says:

    queit simply the best comic show on the web, fuck all the rest and there
    boring podcasts. ifanboy vids go hard

  6. Guilherme Steinmacher says:
  7. Val de Marino says:

    Cudowne!?

  8. Shiranui117 says:

    Does anyone know the words to this, either in Greek or English??

  9. TDoliable says:

    Balsam dla Duszy! Pi?kne!?

  10. Nicholas Marinides says:

    From the fascinating notes:

    From a performance at Stanford University’s Bing Concert Hall. February 1,
    2013.

    Sunday Prokeimenon in Mode 1. MS Patmos 221 (ca. 1162-1179)

    Program note:

    Dry versus Wet Sound and the Experiment with Live Auralization in Bing Hall

    Cappella Romana, Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and
    Acoustics and the Art & Art History Department

    Tonight we will experiment with digital technology in the second half of
    Cappella Romana’s concert in order to transform the Bing Hall into the
    reverberant soundscape of Hagia Sophia (532-537), which defined the
    medieval spiritual experience and man’s embeddedness in the world.

    We live in a culture that values dry, direct, and efficient sound. This
    aesthetic predisposition emerged during the Machine Age (1900-1933) and it
    transformed our relationship to sound. Before, speech or chanting
    reverberating in resonant ancient stone interiors made individual words
    unclear. The electroacoustic signal, stripped of ambient noise, and piped
    into dry and inert rooms, by contrast, allowed individual words to be heard
    with clarity and directness.

    Modern acoustics started with the building of Boston’s Symphony Hall
    (1900). In the process the physicist Wallace Sabine discovered a formula
    for predicting the reverberation of a space. This is the length of time a
    sound produced in an interior continues to reflect off surfaces until it
    gradually decays into inaudibility. Sabine’s formula established a relation
    between materials and interior volume. This discovery ushered in the
    development of acoustics as science and the engineering of new synthetic
    building materials. Both advances allowed the reverberation of any interior
    to be manipulated and adjusted for the particular function of a space. As
    the aesthetics of the modern dry and efficient sound permeated the city, it
    shaped the expectation of concert hall acoustics from an average
    reverberation time of 4 seconds to a drop to ca. 2 seconds. In treating
    reverberation as noise, modern technology severed the relationship between
    sound and space.

    By contrast, in the pre-modern world the acoustics of the space was the
    direct product of the natural materials. The marble interior of Hagia
    Sophia was 70 meters long, while in height it reached 56 meters at the apex
    of the great dome. The vast chamber and its reflective surfaces of marble
    and gold resulted in unprecedented acoustics of over ten seconds
    reverberation time. As a museum Hagia Sophia today has lost its voice, no
    performances could take place in it. Using new digital technology developed
    at CCRMA, the second portion of Cappella Romana’s concert at Bing aims to
    recreate sound of what singing in Hagia Sophia must have been like. Each
    singer caries a microphone that records the sound transforming it into a
    digital signal, which is then imprinted with the reverberant response of
    Hagia Sophia. What you hear as a wet sound is the product of a digitally
    produced signal transmitted through loudspeakers placed strategically to
    create an enveloping soundfield. This digital signal may shock you with the
    way it relativizes speech, transforming its content into a chiaroscuro of
    indistinct but immersive sound. For the Byzantines, this sonic experience
    was associated with the water: the waves of the sea.

    Jonathan Abel, consulting professor at CCRMA
    Bissera Pentcheva, associate professor at the Art & Art History Department

    For more information about the scientific and aesthetic/interpretive
    framework of this collaborative project, see our website:
    http://iconsofsound.stanford.edu?

  11. Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick says:

    From the fascinating notes:

    From a performance at Stanford University’s Bing Concert Hall. February 1,
    2013.

    Sunday Prokeimenon in Mode 1. MS Patmos 221 (ca. 1162-1179)

    Program note:

    Dry versus Wet Sound and the Experiment with Live Auralization in Bing Hall

    Cappella Romana, Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and
    Acoustics and the Art & Art History Department

    Tonight we will experiment with digital technology in the second half of
    Cappella Romana’s concert in order to transform the Bing Hall into the
    reverberant soundscape of Hagia Sophia (532-537), which defined the
    medieval spiritual experience and man’s embeddedness in the world.

    We live in a culture that values dry, direct, and efficient sound. This
    aesthetic predisposition emerged during the Machine Age (1900-1933) and it
    transformed our relationship to sound. Before, speech or chanting
    reverberating in resonant ancient stone interiors made individual words
    unclear. The electroacoustic signal, stripped of ambient noise, and piped
    into dry and inert rooms, by contrast, allowed individual words to be heard
    with clarity and directness.

    Modern acoustics started with the building of Boston’s Symphony Hall
    (1900). In the process the physicist Wallace Sabine discovered a formula
    for predicting the reverberation of a space. This is the length of time a
    sound produced in an interior continues to reflect off surfaces until it
    gradually decays into inaudibility. Sabine’s formula established a relation
    between materials and interior volume. This discovery ushered in the
    development of acoustics as science and the engineering of new synthetic
    building materials. Both advances allowed the reverberation of any interior
    to be manipulated and adjusted for the particular function of a space. As
    the aesthetics of the modern dry and efficient sound permeated the city, it
    shaped the expectation of concert hall acoustics from an average
    reverberation time of 4 seconds to a drop to ca. 2 seconds. In treating
    reverberation as noise, modern technology severed the relationship between
    sound and space.

    By contrast, in the pre-modern world the acoustics of the space was the
    direct product of the natural materials. The marble interior of Hagia
    Sophia was 70 meters long, while in height it reached 56 meters at the apex
    of the great dome. The vast chamber and its reflective surfaces of marble
    and gold resulted in unprecedented acoustics of over ten seconds
    reverberation time. As a museum Hagia Sophia today has lost its voice, no
    performances could take place in it. Using new digital technology developed
    at CCRMA, the second portion of Cappella Romana’s concert at Bing aims to
    recreate sound of what singing in Hagia Sophia must have been like. Each
    singer caries a microphone that records the sound transforming it into a
    digital signal, which is then imprinted with the reverberant response of
    Hagia Sophia. What you hear as a wet sound is the product of a digitally
    produced signal transmitted through loudspeakers placed strategically to
    create an enveloping soundfield. This digital signal may shock you with the
    way it relativizes speech, transforming its content into a chiaroscuro of
    indistinct but immersive sound. For the Byzantines, this sonic experience
    was associated with the water: the waves of the sea.

    Jonathan Abel, consulting professor at CCRMA
    Bissera Pentcheva, associate professor at the Art & Art History Department

    For more information about the scientific and aesthetic/interpretive
    framework of this collaborative project, see our website:
    http://iconsofsound.stanford.edu?

  12. muraiki says:

    This is astonishingly beautiful. I’m a novice byzantine chanter and I love
    the hymns of the church so much. Is there any way to acquire a copy of the
    manuscript? Although I guess it could be written using older neumes that I
    have no knowledge of!

  13. Chris Shanahan says:

    This is great

  14. odiakonmykola says:

    If this genre of liturgical music was even vaguely similar in the early
    tenth-century, I can see why the Primary Chronicle reported that Prince
    Vladimir’s emissaries “did not know whether they were on heaven or on
    earth.” Can we assume that the manuscript below is of Constantinopolitan
    cathedral provenance?

  15. Maria Gomez Murphy says:

    Is it possible to hear your soul go “Wow”?

  16. Old Goat says:

    Wow, this is fabulous!

  17. Alexander Lingas says:

    The performing edition was made by Dr Ioannis Arvanitis from MS Patmos 221,
    a Psaltikon copied between the years 1162 and 1179.

  18. nagmat1 says:

    The Fall of Constantinople, 1453 And send word to the Franks, that the Turk
    has taken the City, to come and empty it, to leave nothing behind. To take
    Aghia Sophia, with its gold screens, to take the Gospel, and the Altar.
    “And our Lady when she heard it, her eyes filled with tears, and Michael
    and Gabriel they comforted her: Weep not our Lady, and be not tearful, With
    the passing of years, and in time, they’ll be ours again”.

  19. rocco flavioni says:

    operative word being ‘probably’. ‘?? ????? ???’:Heraclitus. mystical….

  20. kristine wood says:

    this speaks to my heart….thank you….

  21. M. blakelylaw says:

    No pyrotechnics & the audience is listening raptly. There’s hope for the
    human race yet.

  22. Paul Stetsenko says:

    I just was at Cappella’s concert at the National Gallery in Washington DC.
    I inhaled at the first note, and could not exhale till very end. I could
    not even say whether I was in heaven or on earth.

  23. sunkid77 says:

    I visited Hagia Sophia last November, and was moved to tears just being
    inside there. The acoustics are swirlingly and intoxicatingly beautiful,
    and the music feeds the soul. I can only imagine the splendor of the
    Liturgy being celebrated inside that beautiful 6th century church.

  24. Daniel Buchanan says:

    I’m jealous you got to visit, it sounds totally incredible!

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