DesignBytes: Flattening Existing Icons with Photoshop

Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color with no…
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20 Responses to “DesignBytes: Flattening Existing Icons with Photoshop”

  1. Android Developers says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  2. Eric Cochran says:

    +Brian Cochran
    Another outstanding demonstration from +Roman Nurik. ?

  3. Noel Melendez says:

    Flat Icons with Photoshop?

  4. Nawaf Alghamdi says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  5. Lila patel says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  6. Tarakeshwar M Sriram says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  7. Stephan Linzner says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  8. Muthukrishnan Rajendran says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  9. Abinash Mohanty says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  10. melvin ho yk says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  11. Mateusz Jakubowski says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  12. Shuja Rafi says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  13. Simone Leoni says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  14. Dmitry Tarianyk says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  15. ALI REZA SOLEIMANI, ARCHITECTURE INTERIOR DESIGNING-????? ????????? ????? says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  16. ??? says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  17. takuya horikita says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  18. Anton Senik says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

  19. Gaurav Ganoo says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar?

  20. Steven Shepherd says:

    Today’s episode of #DesignBytes from +Roman Nurik is a screencast
    demonstrating how to *flatten existing icons with Adobe Photoshop*.

    Android’s iconography style guidelines [0] for action bar and notification
    icons call for flat, pictographic icons that use a single foreground color
    with no additional styling or effects. When working with vector source
    graphics, it’s easy to make final, flat icon assets. However, sometimes you
    only have pre-styled raster graphics to use as sources for your icons. In
    these cases, you can flatten or recolor those source assets using the
    techniques demonstrated in this screencast.

    [0] http://developer.android.com/design/style/iconography.html#action-bar

    #AndroidDesign?

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